Sunday, June 24, 2007

The Simon



SW WIND 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 8 SECONDS...DROPPING TO W SWELL 5 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
I've posted a pic of this derelict just under the bridge of the Coast Highway at the Little Nestucca River. She's a concrete-hulled boat and floated there for many years before settling onto the bank about a decade ago I'd estimate...whether from a leak or simply filling with rainwater in a wet winter, I don't know.
The last time I posted her pic I asked if anyone knew the history of this boat...no response. I don't know when concrete hulls began to be produced and whether this boat was used to transport materials along the river, was associated with the old cannery on the bay or if there was another duty.
Anyhow, I'll ask again...anyone know the history on the Simon?

12 comments:

Gaz said...

Ask Matt Love, he's a custodian of the estuary, he might know......

Doc said...

Hey Gaz

If you see him...can you ask him?
Or direct him to this blog?

Gaz said...

What...... now I'm interning for this blog?? Sheesh!

Doc said...

It's not like you spend any time updating your blogs...

fixated and dreaming... said...

Ferrous cement has been used in boat building since the 1940's, I know nothing about this boat though....

Anonymous said...

We first saw ferro-cement boats start appearing in Half Moon Bay around 1971. The material was originally developed during WW2 as a cheap way to build disposable landing craft and such. They were the rage with a lot of ocean hippies in HMB during the 70's, who were all going to sail off to a better world..only one managed to do so. To this day, a handful still sit abandoned within the harbor. A few have become low rent domiciles for what we used to call hippies - and are now called dirt bags.. :)

Gaz said...

Alrighty Doc, I spoke to Matt today and he gave me the story as far as he knows it....... the hull was constructed by an eccentric individual name presently forgotten by locals......but let's call him Simon just because.

They launched the hull with plans to finish her on the water I suppose, however she must have been a bit heavy on the port side and she never was moved from the present location due obvious reasons.

The eccentric did move however, that is a bit sad.....

Anonymous said...

Brdsurf here
hey doc, some good stuff here.
I remember seeing this as a child. It was an interesting thing to look as at we got ready for the windy road going towards neskowin before the project that straightened out everything.
Best as I can recall the eccentric guy had to kind of go away. The boat was never finished and it had been listing to one side or the other about the late 80's. It used to be you could see the pilings there to which it was tied to, but those eventually rotted. After seeing this thing just sitting there for sooooo long a few of us thought it would be fun to take one of the fire trucks there with some rescue airbags, pump the water out, tie the air bags to help with floatation since none of us really knew the stability of the boat, hook up just a couple outboards and see if we could get it ocean bound. Our idea was that we could drive it up to the cape and sink the thing inbetween the points so as to create a new reef that would be hopefully as consistent as the wave was in the mid to late 80s. Youthfull dreaming!
Most of the water damage inside came after the flood of 96 when the boat was still kind of tied down, at which point the water level came over the side that was listed and started filling it in.
Suprised that it is still there....

Anonymous said...

Not sure if anyone is still viewing this site, or is even interested, but that boat belongs to my dad. He built and launched Simon. Years ago tresspassers boarded her and threw major parts and tools overboard. Many attempts were made to bring her around.

Doc said...

Hey Anon

Would love to hear more about how the boat was constructed if you see this message

Anonymous said...

Do you have and email or wep page we can talk on

Anonymous said...

Simon was constructed from 330 bags of concrete and steel frame work, a naval boat/ vessel commandeered by bandits, which are anonymous/ i know but will not say, who terrorized many other vessels on thee Oregon coast, the ship was run aground shortly after launching on high tide, after the hull was filled with water is when it rolled over on its side and never re floated i found out later that the name Simon was after Simon in the Bible to be fishers of men.